Fitness Books

Books

The more knowledge we have the easier is for us to resolve problems. Self-Development has always to be our goal, it is what keep us entertain in this world and help our brain to be healthy.

If you are ever looking for books to get motivated these ones are really good, I’m also adding some highlights. Enjoy.

SPARK

  • Did you know you can beat stress, lift your mood, fight memory loss, sharpen your intellect, and function better than ever simply by elevating your heart rate and breaking a sweat? The evidence is incontrovertible: Aerobic exercise physically remodels our brains for peak performance.

Highlights

  • The panel found enough evidence to support the findings of the California studies, and it also reported that physical activity has a positive influence on memory, concentration, and classroom behavior. It didn’t specify gym class, but you can see how the students in Naperville are getting a healthy jump start.
  • Exercise immediately increases levels of dopamine, and if you stay on some sort of schedule, the brain cells in your motivation center will sprout new dopamine receptors, giving you newfound initiative. You’re wearing in new neural pathways or perhaps refurbishing ones that are rusty from disuse, and it only takes a few weeks to solidify a habit. Exercise can become a self-reinforcing behavior that helps you trump your genes.
  • If you haven’t been in the habit of exercising, it can be helpful to join a gym or hire a personal trainer, because spending the money is a strong motivator.
  • If you get your body in shape, your mind will follow.
  • If you suddenly quit drinking, for instance, you’re turning off the dopamine spigot and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis gets thrown out of balance. The intense unpleasantness of withdrawal lasts for only a few days, but your system remains sensitive for much longer. If you’re in this delicate state and come under further stress, your brain interprets the situation as an emergency and sends you looking for more alcohol.

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This is my self-help book for the season.”―Houston Chronicle


“At last a book that explains to me why I feel so much better if I run in the morning!”―Dr. Susan M. Love, author of Dr. Susan Love’s Menopause and Hormone Book and Dr. Susan Love’s Breast Book

“SPARK is just what we need. In mental health, exercise is a growth stock and Ratey is our best broker.”―Ken Duckworth, M.D., Medical Director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness

“This book is a real turning point that explains something I’ve been trying to figure out for years. Exercise is not simply necessary, as Dr. Ratey clearly shows, it’s medicine.”―Greg LeMond, three-time winner of the Tour de France

No Sweat: How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness.

Michelle Segar PhD.

  • We always start with the best of intentions when we begin a new exercise program. In fact, we could not be more determined to tone our bodies and get in shape! But then our planned week of five days at the gym or doing an at-home program turns into three days, into one day, into . . . Who has the time?The truth is, we still really do want to be healthy and fit, but we have become so overwhelmed and overextended with other nonnegotiables in life that we view exercise as just another chore to complete–an optional chore

Highlights

  • “How about just living your life?” I responded. “How about deciding that it’s okay to forget about dieting? Instead of watching calories and driving yourself to sweat, you’ll begin enjoying your life by being as physically engaged in it as possible. How does that sound?”
  • Research shows that people’s most common motivations for exercising—weight loss and better health—have actually been associated with doing the least amount of exercise.
  • If you haven’t been in the habit of exercising, it can be helpful to join a gym or hire a personal trainer, because spending the money is a strong motivator.
  • Our past experiences with exercise, our past reasons for doing it, and what we have learned to believe about it (as children and as adults) combine together to generate our Meaning for exercising and being physically active.
  • People tend to approach things that feel good and avoid things that feel bad. Your decisions in the moment are based on your feelings about an outcome rather than its value to you. So how you feel about an activity (e.g., How do I feel while I exercise?) is more likely to determine whether you consistently decide to do it, rather than its value to you (e.g., How much weight can I lose from this exercise?).

Editorial Reviews

Review

“…not merely a weight-loss guide but rather a motivational manual to self-care and sustainable change… for persons wishing to set goals, change behavior, and/or improve their lifestyle.” –Library Journal

“…compelling… must read book… Segar is at once compassionate and firm, intelligent and approachable.” –Foreword Reviews

“..reveals how to make one of those key habits, exercise, a part of your life—for good…five simple tips that make perfect sense.” –Health.com

The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Charles Duhigg

  •  At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.

Highlights

  • When a habit emerges, the brain stops fully participating in decision making. It stops working so hard, or diverts focus to other tasks. So unless you deliberately fight a habit—unless you find new routines—the pattern will unfold automatically.
  • Habits never really disappear. They’re encoded into the structures of our brain, and that’s a huge advantage for us, because it would be awful if we had to relearn how to drive after every vacation. The problem is that your brain can’t tell the difference between bad and good habits, and so if you have a bad one, it’s always lurking there, waiting for the right cues and rewards.”
  • If you haven’t been in the habit of exercising, it can be helpful to join a gym or hire a personal trainer, because spending the money is a strong motivator.
  • Anyone can use this basic formula to create habits of her or his own. Want to exercise more? Choose a cue, such as going to the gym as soon as you wake up, and a reward, such as a smoothie after each workout. Then think about that smoothie, or about the endorphin rush you’ll feel. Allow yourself to anticipate the reward. Eventually, that craving will make it easier to push through the gym doors every day.
  • The evidence is clear: If you want to change a habit, you must find an alternative routine, and your odds of success go up dramatically when you commit to changing as part of a group. Belief is essential, and it grows out of a communal experience, even if that community is only as large as two people.

Editorial Reviews

Review

“…not merely a weight-loss guide but rather a motivational manual to self-care and sustainable change… for persons wishing to set goals, change behavior, and/or improve their lifestyle.” –Library Journal

“…compelling… must read book… Segar is at once compassionate and firm, intelligent and approachable.” –Foreword Reviews

“..reveals how to make one of those key habits, exercise, a part of your life—for good…five simple tips that make perfect sense.” –Health.com

“Sharp, provocative, and useful.”—Jim Collins

“Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. The Power of Habit is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.”Financial Times

“Entertaining . . . enjoyable . . . fascinating . . . a serious look at the science of habit formation and change.”The New York Times Book Review

“Cue: see cover. Routine: read book. Reward: fully comprehend the art of manipulation.”Bloomberg Businessweek

“A fresh examination of how routine behaviors take hold and whether they are susceptible to change . . . The stories that Duhigg has knitted together are all fascinating in their own right, but take on an added dimension when wedded to his examination of habits.”— Associated Press

“..reveals how to make one of those key habits, exercise, a part of your life—for good…five simple tips that make perfect sense.” –Health.com